Magical Monet inspires visitors

“An unforgettable experience. I could look at it forever.”

Monet’s Haystacks: Snow Effect has wowed audiences in Kendal since January – but its last day on display is this Saturday (28 April 2018).

Monet blog

The painting, dated 1891, has been on loan from the National Gallery of Scotland. It will return north of the border at the end of the month.

Reaction from visitors to this painting has been remarkable. We’ve been delighted to bring such an important work to Cumbria and the feedback from audiences has been wonderful. 

Our visitors’ book has been full of emotional comments from people who have struck a bond with the painting.

Comments from visitors include: 

  • “My first Monet experience. I live in Kendal. It’s so good to have this on my doorstep.” 
  • “The most amazing experience to view this beautiful painting in my home town. Thank-you so much.”
  • “To be able to appreciate it in such calm surroundings is wonderful. Up close the brushstrokes and colours are so vivid.”
  • “I moved forward and viewed the work from just a few inches away. The painting had me spellbound. After hours sitting with this painting I seem to be even more aware of the shifting pattern of colour and light in the sky. Thank-you Monet.”
  • “Our students were able to view and sketch the Haystacks uninterrupted and value the artwork while assisting their GCSE coursework. Very privileged. Thank-you.”
  • “In the presence of a master. I was quite nervy. But in a good way.”
  • “What a treat to see Monet’s work in such a peaceful setting and with chairs from which you can enjoy the experience.”
  • “I absolutely love art and this experience has made me love art even more.”

More details about Haystacks: Snow Effect: https://www.abbothall.org.uk/exhibitions/claude-monet

Two-minute-Monet: Facts about the founder of Impressionism

Oscar Claude Monet was born on 14 November 1890 in Paris, France. His mother was a singer, his father a grocer.

From an early age he had a love of drawing – and drew caricatures of his school teachers.

Monet went to Le Harve School of Arts in 1851 and sold caricatures to bring in extra money.

Monet married twice and had two children.

Following the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, Monet and his family fled to England. Inspired by the art of John Constable, Monet quickly began painting scenes of London including the Houses of Parliament and Hyde Park.

Monet first spotted the village of Giverny from the window of a train and then relocated to this rural haven outside Paris in 1883.

Claude Monet lived in the village of Giverny for 43 years. And it is here he painted his famous Haystacks series of works.

Monet’s painting Impression, Sunrise (1872) led to the naming of a whole movement we now know as Impressionism.

When Monet first moved to Giverny, the village’s population was around 300. Today it’s still at tiny place with some 500 in habitants. However, the village is swelled by tourists who flock to see Monet’s house and gardens which were made open to visitors in 1980.

There are some 2,500 paintings, drawings and pastels attributed to Monet.

He struggled with depression and poverty during his lifetime. He once attempted suicide.

In 1918 Monet donated 12 of his Water Lilies series of paintings to France to celebrate the Armistice.

Monet remains one of the most famous painters in history and his works can be seen in the most prestigious art galleries around the globe.

Monet died from lung cancer at the age of 86 on 5 December 1926. He is buried in the Giverny cemetery.

Monet’s Haystacks: Snow Effect (1891) is now on show at Abbot Hall, Kendal until 28 April 2018. It is on loan from National Galleries of Scotland.