Painting Pop’s Playlist – the songs that swung 1962

Abbot Hall’s Painting Pop exhibition celebrates British Pop Art in the period around 1962 – a year known for great painters and great performers.

Whether music fed art, or art fed the music, is still up for debate.

The era of swinging London, of clubs, of freedom, fun and creativity was certainly an inspiration for many of the artists in our exhibition.

Painting Pop presents works by leading artists in British Pop Art who made a significant contribution to the development of twentieth century and contemporary art practice.

Away from the gallery walls, and into the dance halls, the artists making the headlines included The Beach Boys, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Patsy Cline and the Beatles.

Amazingly the four lads from Liverpool were rejected by record company Decca at the turn of 1962. Fortunes would change stratospherically for Paul, John, George and Pete Best when Brian Epstein was appointed their manager a few weeks later. That summer Best was fired and Ringo Starr joined the ranks.

The year also saw the debut long player from American Bob Dylan, while back in breezy London The Rolling Stones were getting it together.

Musically everything seemed to come together in 1962 on both sides of the Atlantic. From South Liverpool to Southern California music was swinging and surfing.

In celebration of the brush strokes of paint and the strumming of guitars, we’ve compiled ten of our favourite records from 1962.

The collection sways and swoons to the sounds of Elvis, The Beach Boys, The Isley Brothers, Bobby Vinton and more.

Listen to our Painting Pop playlist on Spotify.

It’s a collaborative list – so feel free to add your favourites.

A Summer of Rag Rugging

***UPDATE: The rugging will continue this October 22 & 24-27. Come to the museum during half term to take part in finishing this great textile project. Full details here.*** 

We’re creating giant rag rugs inspired by the rugged Cumbrian landscape! Sally Fallows is running drop-in workshops across Abbot Hall Art Gallery and Blackwell, The Arts & Crafts House all summer long. The finished rag rugs and wall hanging will animate the learning centre at Windermere Jetty, Museum of Boats, Steam and Stories when it opens in 2017. Over 250 people have contributed so far – and there’s plenty left to do! So drop in and try your hand at traditional textile techniques with a contemporary twist.

 

Morning workshops at Abbot Hall Art Gallery
Monday to Friday until 2 September / 10:30 – 12:30 

Included with admission – children FREE 

Create an aerial view of Windermere in wool using a mix of hooking, prodding, crochet and pom-poms! Inspired by Winifred Nicholson’s views of Cumbria, on display at Abbot Hall Art Gallery until 15 October 2016. Nicholson designed over 180 rag rugs and commissioned local artists to make them. We also drew inspiration from Alexandra Kehayoglou‘s spectacular wool rug artworks.

 

Afternoon workshops at Blackwell, The Arts & Crafts House
Monday to Friday until 2 September / 2:00 – 4:00
Included with admission – children FREE 

Help make a gigantic wall hanging inspired by the view from Blackwell – complete with fleecy sheep and boats sailing on Windermere. Enjoy an afternoon of crafting in an idyllic setting. Materials are locally sourced from William’s Wools and Faye’s Sewing Box – including local alpaca yarn from Town End Yarns.

 

Hughie O’Donoghue

By Harriet Hunter

This painting is a bold colours painting with red and black, blue and cream. The marks represent a person. An adventurous painting looking like a explorer swinging from branch to branch in a sunset. I like this painting because its fearful and cool with the moves. I don’t like this painting because its got red in. I disagree with it existing in the painting. I don’t like the painting at all mostly at all.

Hughie O’Donoghue

By Kofi Fawcett

I don’t like the painting because I don’t think the illustrator has used enough colours. The painting looks like someone falling into a volcano and trying not to by hanging on and pushing to the sides or the blue at the bottom looks like the sea and the black looks like a cliff with someone digging their fingernails into try and stop themselves from falling. My other dislike was because I thought the colours were too dark.