Katie Spragg, Ceramics at Blackwell

The Katie Spragg, Ceramics exhibition has opened at Blackwell, The Arts & Crafts House and will continue until 10 May 2018. In the video, Spragg introduces the exhibition and discusses how Blackwell has influenced her work.

Katie Spragg, Ceramics Exhibition at Blackwell from Lakeland Arts on Vimeo.

Recognised as one of the country’s finest up-and-coming talents, Royal College of Art graduate, Katie Spragg combines clay with a range of processes including animation, illustration and installation. Her works aim to evoke a sense of wonder about being outside in nature.

The exhibition of ceramics at Blackwell will showcase eight new responses to the Arts and Crafts house and the surrounding landscape, alongside six existing works previously displayed by the Craft Council COLLECT at the Saatchi Gallery, Miami Art Week and the British Ceramic Biennial Award show.

Spragg spent a week at Blackwell in November and was inspired to create new works based on her experience. She said, “In the mornings Blackwell feels very serene. The nooks and corners of the house lend themselves to daydreaming, particularly at this time of day. I became interested in how the landscape is framed through the windows of the house and also how nature is brought inside.”

Alongside this exhibition at Blackwell, two digital works by Spragg will also be on display at Abbot Hall Art Gallery until 28 April 2018.

Spragg’s works are in demand. A recent piece, Hedgerow, was purchased in spring 2017 by the world’s leading museum of art and design, the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Whether through sharing a story or conjuring a collective memory, Spragg’s works highlight the forgotten sources of joy and amusement that surround us, and aim to arose curiosity.

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Two-minute-Monet: Facts about the founder of Impressionism

Oscar Claude Monet was born on 14 November 1890 in Paris, France. His mother was a singer, his father a grocer.

From an early age he had a love of drawing – and drew caricatures of his school teachers.

Monet went to Le Harve School of Arts in 1851 and sold caricatures to bring in extra money.

Monet married twice and had two children.

Following the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, Monet and his family fled to England. Inspired by the art of John Constable, Monet quickly began painting scenes of London including the Houses of Parliament and Hyde Park.

Monet first spotted the village of Giverny from the window of a train and then relocated to this rural haven outside Paris in 1883.

Claude Monet lived in the village of Giverny for 43 years. And it is here he painted his famous Haystacks series of works.

Monet’s painting Impression, Sunrise (1872) led to the naming of a whole movement we now know as Impressionism.

When Monet first moved to Giverny, the village’s population was around 300. Today it’s still at tiny place with some 500 in habitants. However, the village is swelled by tourists who flock to see Monet’s house and gardens which were made open to visitors in 1980.

There are some 2,500 paintings, drawings and pastels attributed to Monet.

He struggled with depression and poverty during his lifetime. He once attempted suicide.

In 1918 Monet donated 12 of his Water Lilies series of paintings to France to celebrate the Armistice.

Monet remains one of the most famous painters in history and his works can be seen in the most prestigious art galleries around the globe.

Monet died from lung cancer at the age of 86 on 5 December 1926. He is buried in the Giverny cemetery.

Monet’s Haystacks: Snow Effect (1891) is now on show at Abbot Hall, Kendal until 28 April 2018. It is on loan from National Galleries of Scotland.